Monthly Archives: August 2017

A Voice of Colorado No. 275 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the Frank Watrous House, in Fort Collins, built in 1892.

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A Voice of Colorado No. 274 Version 5.0:

As of 5:00 P.M., August 28, 2017, the deadline to submit petitions to appear on the ballot for the November 2017 election for the Loveland, CO. City Council, the following have fulfilled the requirement to pursue elected office:
Mayor:
• John H. Fogle
• Larry Heckel
• Jacki Marsh
Ward 1:
• Jeremy Jersvig
• Lenard Larkin
Ward 2:
• Gary Lindquist
• Gail Snyder
• Kathi A. Wright
Ward 3:
• John Ryan Keil
• Steve Olson
Ward 4:
• Dave Clark

A Voice of Colorado No. 273 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the Methodist Episcopal Parsonage, located at Olive and College Avenue in Fort Collins, CO. It was built in 1901, but has since been demolished.

A Voice of Colorado No. 272 Version 5.0:

Then there were three.

The race for the next mayor in Loveland, CO. recently took an interesting turn when Loveland business owner Jacki Marsh filed her affidavit of candidacy. Marsh, who previously withdrew from the Ward II race, reported with this announcement that she has just begun to collect the required signatures, and acknowledged that getting the required 25 signatures by the deadline of August 28, 2017 would be a challenge. Her competition for the elected position of mayor includes Ward III councilor John Fogle and former council member Larry Heckel.

Originally Marsh planned to run for the Ward II seat vacated by Joan Shaffer, but made it known that she would withdraw if her friend, Kathi Wright, chose to run against Gail Snyder to avoid a splitting of the vote.

She said a reason for running is because she does not approve of how the current mayor reorganizes the agenda of the council meetings, favoring special interests, including corporations and developers. If elected she will encourage a more balanced agenda, which should allow for citizens to speak. Other possibilities to ensure equal time include a rebuttal time for citizen commenters – allowing a member of the public whose three-minute speaking time was insufficient to offer rebuttal or clarification. She also suggested discouraging council members from offering commentary during question periods.

In other Loveland races:

Dave Clark, the Ward IV incumbent, officially announced his intention to seek re-election. He has submitted the required signatures, which have been verified.

His run for elected office technically makes the fifth term for Clark, although only two have been full four-year terms. He joined the Loveland City Council in a special election in January 2004, ran unopposed in 2005, left the council in 2009 when he attempted unsuccessfully to run for mayor, rejoined the council for a one-year term in 2012 as a result of a special election, and won a full term to the council in 2013.

A former contractor, Clark is executive director of the Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, located in Johnstown, southeast of Loveland.

Mr. Clark supports widening Interstate 25 to address growing congestion on the road, as well as increased traffic on U.S. Highway 34.

He also emphasizes the city’s budget, which he says needs to focus on responsible spending.

Currently he is running unopposed.

In the Ward I race Jeremy Jersvig announced his intention to fill the seat being vacated by Troy Krenning. He completed an affidavit but has not submitted petition signatures. His presumed competition is Lenard Larkin, who took out a candidate packet, but has not made announcements regarding his intentions.

In Ward II Gail Snyder has submitted the required signatures, and they have been verified. Competition for the seat includes Kathi Wright, who declared her candidacy, but has not returned petitions as required, and Gary Lindquist, who acquired a candidate packet but has not filed anything to date.

In Ward III incumbent Steve Olsen, who was elected in a special election in 2016, has filed his petitions. His competition, John Keil, who completed an affidavit for candidacy, has made it known that he will not run for council in this election.

A Voice of Colorado No. 271 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the H.R. and Narsa Lovett House, at 316 South Howes Street, in Fort Collins, CO., which was built in 1924, and subsequently demolished.

A Voice of Colorado No. 270 Version 5.0:

Sears/K-Mart announced the closure of more locations across the United States of America, with two K-Mart locations in Colorado. Several readers of this effort, following this news, noted that they are pleased to know the Loveland, CO. remains open for the present. Several residents in Loveland also noted that they would like their location to do several things to endure:

• Sell American-made products.

• Stop selling and promoting fashions that condone drug use.

• Re-establish the outdoor section of the store, where people could buy fishing and hunting licenses as well as live bait, lures, and ammunition.

• Re-establish the café once located in the Loveland K-mart and offer good food for a good price.

A Voice of Colorado No. 269 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the Baptist Church, in Delta, CO., which was built beginning in 1905 and was completed in 1906.