A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 22

Over the past four to five hundred years the Colorado Plains, which include present-day Larimer County, have been used by a variety of groups. Physical evidence, which includes records, indicates claims by Cheyenne to be likely: The land was home to the Cheyenne, the Arapaho, the Sioux.
From an archaeological perspective cooking debris, trash, tool discards, stone circles or teepee rings, along with cooking and heating hearths provide little information about distinction among these populations.

Camp arrangements may provide superficial indicators about tribal affiliation: Some groups arranged their teepees in a linear camp while others arranged their lodges in circles.

Additionally, specific populations preferred certain types over others – valley bottoms near water or inside of tree lines or on open upland.
From an architectural perspective it may be possible to identify the group: Ute and Shoshone, as well as other mountain-based groups used four main poles for their teepees while Plains tribes used three poles.

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A Voice of Colorado No. 417 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the Larimer County Fair Association, Art Hall, in Fort Collins, CO. It was built in 1890.

A Voice of Colorado No. 415 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was a duplex located at 227 – 220 West Mulberry Street, in Fort Collins. CO.

A Voice of Colorado No. 413 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was a duplex located at 221 – 223 West Mulberry Street, in Fort Collins, CO.

A Voice of Colorado No. 411 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the J.A.C. Kissock and C.J. Murray Block, located at 115 – 121 East Mountain Avenue in Fort Collins, CO. It was built in 1889 and burned in 1895.

A Voice of Colorado No. 409 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the P. Bernard Block, located on Linden Street in Fort Collins, CO. It was built in 1905.

A Voice of Colorado No. 407 Version 5.0:

One of the best known architects in the Larimer County, CO. area in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was Montezuma Fuller, whose output was prolific.

Among his accomplishments was the E.W. Reed Block, located on Linden Street in Fort Collins, CO. It was built in 1892.