A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 564

In the summer of 1903 Freeland O. Stanley arrived to the Estes Valley with a burden: He had tuberculosis, and had come to the higher elevation in an attempt to recover. Before the season was over he was improved. He and his wife, Flora, decided to return and purchased 8.4 acres where they built a summer home in an area called “Rockside”, which was located north of the future village of Estes Park, CO. The choice in the setting was almost without equal: A sloping hillside that faced Longs Peak and the Front Range.

The “cottage” that was constructed was 5,240 square feet, and would be the summer residence of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley for the next thirty-six years.

The house reflected Mr. Stanley’s interest in architecture: It features a high foundation, imposing entrance, Doric columns, and a Georgian Colonial Revival style as The Stanley Hotel, built five years.

In time Mr. Stanley also built a two-story carriage house that included a garage and a workshop. The garage was noteworthy because it featured a built-in turntable that saved Mr. Stanley the effort of having to back out of the garage.

The lower level of the carriage house provided an area for the billiard table – the only form of recreation that Mr. Stanley pursued.

Behind the house, off the rear porch, there was a path that navigated boulders to a level outcropping when Mr. Stanley meditated or played his violin.

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A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 562

In the summer of 1903 Freeland O. Stanley arrived to the Estes Valley with a burden: He had tuberculosis, and had come to the higher elevation in an attempt to recover. Before the season was over he was improved. He and his wife, Flora, decided to return and purchased 8.4 acres where they built a summer home in an area called “Rockside”, which was located north of the future village of Estes Park, CO. The choice in the setting was almost without equal: A sloping hillside that faced Longs Peak and the Front Range.

The “cottage” that was constructed was 5,240 square feet, and would be the summer residence of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley for the next thirty-six years.

The house reflected Mr. Stanley’s interest in architecture: It features a high foundation, imposing entrance, Doric columns, and a Georgian Colonial Revival style as The Stanley Hotel, built five years.

A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 298

Although little remains of the sugar beet industry which dominated the economy in northern Colorado several neighborhoods in Fort Collins, CO. represents the presence it once had, and include the Alta Vista, Andersonville, and Buckingham neighborhoods.

Many houses in the neighborhoods do not meet historical standards that would ensure preservation, but more than a few merit consideration, including 224 Second Street, in Fort Collins, CO.

It is also known as The Jacob Steely House, and The Daniel Barreras House.

The house has historical significance because of its association with German – Russian beet workers, who established and developed the Buckingham Neighborhood. Located on the property is an outbuilding from the first period of development in the neighborhood.

The main house is an example of a bungalow exhibiting the characteristics of Craftsman architecture, representing a more permanent and affluent period of development in the area.

A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 296

Although little remains of the sugar beet industry which dominated the economy in northern Colorado several neighborhoods in Fort Collins, CO. represents the presence it once had, and include the Alta Vista, Andersonville, and Buckingham neighborhoods.

Many houses in the neighborhoods do not meet historical standards that would ensure preservation, but more than a few merit consideration, including 132 Second Street, in Fort Collins, CO.

It is also known as The Maier – Miller House, and The Kathel Rodriguez House.

The house has historical significance because of its association with the Maier and Miller families, who were German – Russian sugar beet laborers. It is also associated with the Rodriguez family, which signifies the transition of the neighborhood from German – Russian to Hispanic. Additionally, it is one of the oldest extant structures in the neighborhood, representing the post-flood period of settlement.

From an architectural perspective it is significant because it is an example of early German – Russian sugar beet labor housing, exhibiting the spatial arrangement of homesteads in Russia. Because it is intact and an example of working-class vernacular architecture it is of worthwhile preservation due to the fact it was constructed of second-hand and local materials. The construction was likely done by local, unskilled laborers and was developed as financial means and resources permitted.

A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 294

Although little remains of the sugar beet industry which dominated the economy in northern Colorado several neighborhoods in Fort Collins, CO. represents the presence it once had, and include the Alta Vista, Andersonville, and Buckingham neighborhoods.

Many houses in the neighborhoods do not meet historical standards that would ensure preservation, but more than a few merit consideration, including 124 Second Street, in Fort Collins, Co.

It is also known as The George and Katherine Suppes House, and The Hermelinda Duron House.

The house has historical significance because of its association with the development of the Buckingham Neighborhood, which represented a period of permanent settlement. The house also represents the growing affluence of the predominately working-class families. Additionally, it is also known for its association with German – Russian sugar beet laborers.

Architecturally, it is a simple bungalow which exhibits the characteristics of late-Craftsman-era.

A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 292

Although little remains of the sugar beet industry which dominated the economy in northern Colorado several neighborhoods in Fort Collins, CO. represents the presence it once had, and include the Alta Vista, Andersonville, and Buckingham neighborhoods.

Many houses in the neighborhoods do not meet historical standards that would ensure preservation, but more than a few merit consideration, including 749 Martinez Street, in Fort Collins, CO.

It is also known as The Joe Cordova House and The Andrew C. and Roxanne A. Cordova House.

The house has historical significance because of its association with the early development of the Alta Vista Neighborhood, with the sugar beet industry in northern Colorado, and with the Hispanic settlement in Fort Collins.

Additionally, it is an example of adobe brick construction within one of the northernmost collections of such structures in North America.

A Voice of Colorado Version 2018 No. 290

Although little remains of the sugar beet industry which dominated the economy in northern Colorado several neighborhoods in Fort Collins, CO. represents the presence it once had, and include the Alta Vista, Andersonville, and Buckingham neighborhoods.

Many houses in the neighborhoods do not meet historical standards that would ensure preservation, but more than a few merit consideration, including 748 Martinez Street, in Fort Collins, CO.

It is also known as an example of The Great Western Spanish Colony House, and is also known as The Juan M. Cordova House and The Antonio Alvarado House.

The house has historical significance because of its association with the early development of the Alta Vista Neighborhood, with the sugar beet industry in northern Colorado, and with the Hispanic settlement in Fort Collins.

Additionally, it is an example of adobe brick construction within one of the northernmost collections of such structures in North America.