Tag Archives: Denver

A Voice of Colorado No. 434 Version 5.0:

Make of it what you will: According a report recently released by Colorado Public Interest Research Group (CoPIRG) and Eco-Cycle, entitled “The State of Recycling in Colorado”, which lists residential recycling statistics Loveland, CO. is Number One in the State of Colorado for its residential recycling rate: Sixty one percent of its waste is diverted to a recycling or composting stream annually.

Boulder, CO., which claims to be environmentally friendly, was in the second position in the list of eighteen cities along the Front Range, diverting fifty-three percent of its residential waste from landfills.

Fort Collins, CO., which uses the Larimer County Landfill like Loveland, only diverts thirty percent of its residential waste, which placed in in the Number Eight position on the list, and below the national average, of thirty-four percent.

Overall, the State of Colorado diverts an average of twelve percent of its residential waste annually.

Loveland residents pay a mandatory solid waste management fee, which includes curbside single-stream recycling, and it is for this reason residents apparently participate owing to ease-of-use. Additionally, the City of Loveland maintains a recycling center, which takes more than thirty types of items, including large and small appliances, propane takes, tires, oil, and concrete material. The recycling center allows accepts yard debris and raw wood items, which include grass clippings, leaves, branches, and other organic matter.

Residential Recycling Rates for Front Range Cities in the report:

• Loveland: 61%
• Boulder: 53%
• Louisville: 48%
• Lafayette: 38%
• Longmont: 35%
• Golden: 34%
• Lyons: 33%
• Fort Collins: 30%
• Greenwood Village: 28%
• Superior: 22%
• Denver: 20%
• Sheridan: 18%
• Thornton: 18%
• Lone Tree: 17%
• Commerce City: 16%
• Arvada: 13%
• Northglenn: 11%
• Westminster: 11%

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A Voice of Colorado No. 356 Version 5.0:

It is a basic fact of finances: Introduce a new tax or increase an existing taxes and revenues, more often than not, will decrease. For example, paid parking at the Cherry Creek Shopping Center, in Denver, CO., which went into effect mid-January 2017. From January to July of 2017 Denver experienced a drop in sales tax dollars of $678,096. A decrease which can be attributed to paid parking at the upscale shopping center.

A Voice of Colorado No. 264 Version 5.0:

Steve Barlock, who once worked to get Democrat John Hickenlooper elected Mayor of Denver, Colorado, who previously served as co-chair of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in Colorado, and who has announced his intention to become Governor of the State of Colorado, has made it known that despite the choice of the voter to use monies from the Colorado lottery to acquire land now set aside he is willing to sell off those assets and resources to satisfies the unending hunger of government spending and waste.

Mr. Barlock will not receive my vote for any elected position, in the State of Colorado or elsewhere.

A Voice of Colorado No. 232 Version 5.0:

George Brauchler, who announced his intention to run for Governorship of the State of Colorado, has made it known that he wants to decentralize the state government. It is a proposal that has been met with expected results within a political context: Those to the left side of the aisle, who tend to favor bigger government and centralized government, denounce the proposal while those to the right side of the political aisle are supporting it.

Mr. Brauchler, currently the 18th District Attorney, provides explanation for the proposal by saying that as a long-time resident of the State of Colorado he sees a disconnect between Denver and the rest of the state – a perception based in fact and acknowledged by many Coloradans, who have long believed that they have been on the short end of a stick where representation and financial elements are concerned. By decentralizing state level government each community in Colorado will be on equal footing as proposed by Mr. Brauchler.

Some have concerns about how this would be achieved as presented by Mr. Brauchler, who proposes that stage agency offices in Denver be relocated to communities outside of the Denver metro area. Such undertaking would come with a substantial upfront investment, and many Coloradans, already burdened with the rising cost of living in Colorado as well as the rising cost of healthcare, are reluctant to support such a large expenditure that they are likely to shoulder.

The proposal has value but the value that could be realized is not in cost likely to involve land acquisition and new buildings with infrastructure and construction costs that may not be needed. The value of the proposal must come from Coloradans outside of Denver, who know what is needed for their communities.

More on George Brauchler:

https://www.george2018.com/

A Voice of Colorado No. 221 Version 5.0:

Loveland, CO. was named for William A.H. Loveland. Mr. Loveland and his wife, Miranda Montgomery Loveland, along with Charles Welch, planned Lakewood, CO. as “a streetcar suburb”, and a stop for their Denver, Lakewood, and Golden Railroad. The investment and intention did not produce the desired result.

A Voice of Colorado No. 219 Version 5.0:

Loveland, CO. was named for William A.H. Loveland. Mr. Loveland and his wife, Miranda Montgomery Loveland, along with Charles Welch, planned Lakewood, CO. as “a streetcar suburb”, and a stop for their Denver, Lakewood, and Golden Railroad. The investment and intention did not produce the desired result.

A Voice of Colorado No. 105 Version 5.0:

Loveland, CO. is located approximately 45 miles north of Denver, the capital of Colorado.