Tag Archives: Larimer County

A Voice of Colorado No. 525 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Webster Feedlot burial site on Lone Tree Creek east of Greeley, CO. contained an individual thought to be female, and was between the ages of twenty and thirty years of age at the time of death. The bones were dated to approximately AD 0, placing the individual at the end of the Archaic Stage or the beginning of the Ceramic Stage.

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A Voice of Colorado No. 523 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Happy Hollow Rockshelter near Carr, CO. was occupied from late Archaic times through the Middle Ceramic.
Faunal material recovered included elk, bison, pronghorn, deer, prairie dog, rabbit, and pack rat.

Late occupations at the site included the Upper Republican, which have been dated to approximately AD 1200.

A Voice of Colorado No. 521 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Kaplan-Hoover bison bonebed, located on the north side of Windsor, CO. in Weld County, and about a half mile from the present-day Cache la Poudre River channel, is an Archaic Stage bison trap or buffalo jump.

Although no associated camp site has been unearthed there is significant evidence of human presence and processing of more than two hundred bison killed in the arroyo trap.

Dating to approximately 860 BC the trap may have been used to drive animals over the edge of the arroyo or up to the arroyo from the floodplain for the Cache la Poudre River.

The existence of the trap indicates a knowledge of animal behavior patterns, as humans residing on the land used the arroyo to move bison from grazing areas on the uplands to the river. A study of dental defects indicates that the bison were exposed to little nutritional stress and that implies a healthy supply of grasslands.

The buffalo jump was discovered by a construction in the River West subdivision, and was identified as the “Kaplan-Hoover site”. It was excavated by Colorado State University archaeological employees. During the work project tours and public education played an important role in future preservation. Although the location can be seen from the multi-use path that runs parallel to the river at the conclusion of the excavation the site was covered. In 2003 the site was placed on the National Register. In 2004 it was placed on the Colorado Historic Registers.

To ensure it would remain undisturbed and remain available for future research and open space intention, the property was acquired by the Colorado Historic Preservation Office, the Colorado Open Lands Conservation Program, and assisted by the River West Homeowners Association.

A Voice of Colorado No. 519 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Spring Gulch site, located approximately five miles north of Livermore, CO., contains information suggesting it was occupied from the Early Archaic through the later part of the Ceramic Stage.

The Archaic levels contained hearths and McKean and Magic Mountain projectile points. Much of the lithic material came from locally available Morrison Formation gray quartzite.

Remains of bison and mule deer were the dominant animal species found in the site, but jack and cottontail rabbit, along with bobcat, pocket gopher, vole, red-tailed hawk, western painted turtle, and freshwater clams were also found.

In one of the hearths evidence of charred goosefoot seed was recovered. In the Early and Middle Ceramic levels of the site most of the recovered tool material was quartzite, and a few obsidian pieces.

Along with ceramic fragments artifacts excavated included ground stone grinding slabs, handstones, and hammerstones.

Not far from this site and Livermore is the Archaic and Ceramic stage Owl Canyon Rockshleter, where small, corner-notched, serrated-blade “Hogback” points were unearthed.

A Voice of Colorado No. 517 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Spring Gulch site, located approximately five miles north of Livermore, CO., contains several open camp components, suggesting that it was occupied from the Early Archaic through the later part of the Ceramic Stage.

A Voice of Colorado No. 515 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Jurgens site, located about nine miles east of Greeley, near Kersey, in Weld County, has been dated to the Plano period. It contains three areas indicating a long-term camp, a short-term camp, and an area used for butchering or processing meat.

Because no kill site and no bison skulls have been recovered from the location it is assumed that animals processed were killed elsewhere. Fore limbs, hind limbs, and backbones have been found at the site, indicating almost forty bison.

Faunal remains include deer, moose, pronghorn, elk, rabbit, beaver, muskrat, canid, reptiles and fish. Tools collected at the site include bone and stone tools that might have been used for butchering, hide processing, and seed grinding. Two atlatl hooks have also been recovered – one of antler and one of modified bison tooth.

A Voice of Colorado No. 513 Version 5.0:

Through the archaeological record in Larimer County, CO., an understanding of previous occupants is possible by the application of archaeological site types.

The Wilbur Thomas rock shelter, located near Carr, CO., was used during at least five separate and distinct occupations up to Historic times.
Cody points recovered indicate that the shelter was used in the Plano Period. Additionally, Early Archaic Period Mountain and Middle Archaic McKean and Magic Mountain Points were also recovered.